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Patient Centered Care Example

Pages: 6

Abstract

Patient-centered care is one of the significant elements in the IOM competencies and has massive significance in patient outcomes. The cost of healthcare is a significant issue in the US. It can impact the accessibility and quality of care, as well as the financial stability of providers. Reducing the cost of care can be done by providing discounts to patients who pay cash or negotiating lower prices with healthcare providers. However, barriers, such as the need for discounts for patients who pay cash for their care or the lack of negotiation power with healthcare providers, inhibit these efforts.

Additionally, provider burnout is a significant problem in the healthcare industry that can significantly impact care delivery. One way to reduce provider burnout is to provide training on self-care and stress management. However, the lack of training for providers on self-care and stress management inhibits this effort. Improving the quality of care can also help reduce healthcare costs. This can be done by providing resources for providers on how to best communicate with patients from different cultures. However, a barrier inhibiting improved care quality is the need for more resources for providers to best communicate with patients from different cultures. Improving the quality of care and reducing provider burnout can help reduce the cost of healthcare.

IOM Core Competencies

The IOM Core Competencies (CCs) define healthcare professionals’ knowledge, skills, and abilities to provide high-quality, patient-centered care (Greiner & Knebel, 2020). They were developed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that provides advice on health issues.

I have selected are Patient-Centered Care

Patient-centered care is one of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) six competencies for health care professionals. Patient-centered care has several key components. First, it requires that healthcare professionals take the time to get to know their patients as individuals rather than simply treating them as a collection of symptoms (Santana et al., 2017). This means listening to patients’ concerns and understanding their preferences and values.

Effects of Patient-Centered Care on Patient Care Outcomes

One way is by increasing patient engagement in their care. When patients are actively involved in their care, they are more likely to follow treatment recommendations and take medications as prescribed (Santana et al., 2017). They are also more likely to understand better their condition and what they need to do to stay healthy.

Another way patient-centered care can impact patient outcomes is by improving communication between patients and their care providers. Patients who feel they can openly communicate with their care providers are more likely to follow through with recommended treatments and screenings (Santana et al., 2017). They are also more likely to feel more satisfied with their care.

Finally, patient-centered care can impact patient outcomes by increasing patient access to care. When patients have easy access to care that meets their needs, they are more likely to promptly get the care they need (Santana et al., 2017). This can lead to better health outcomes and decreased costs associated with care.

How Healthcare Practitioners Can Improve Patients’ Outcomes Through Patient-Centered Care

One way is by providing high-quality care tailored to each patient’s needs. This means considering each patient’s unique medical history, lifestyle, and preferences when developing a treatment plan (Santana et al., 2017). This allows patients to make informed decisions about their care and participate actively in their health. Another way to improve patient outcomes is by coordinating care among all the providers involved in a patient’s care. This includes communicating effectively with other providers, such as specialists, to ensure everyone is on the same page about the patient’s treatment plan.

Finally, providers can improve patients’ outcomes by focusing on preventive care. This means providing patients with information and resources to help them maintain a healthy lifestyle and avoid future health problems. It is also important to monitor patients for early signs of disease or deterioration so that treatment can be started as soon as possible (Kuipers et al., 2019). Providers can greatly improve patient outcomes by providing high-quality, coordinated, preventive care. Doing so can help patients live longer, healthier, and happier lives.

How I Can Positively Impact My Clinical Practice and Patient Care Outcomes with Patient-Centered Care

One way I can Positively Impact My Clinical Practice, and Patient Care Outcomes is through Improved communication: When patients feel like they are being listened to. Their concerns are being taken seriously; they are more likely to trust their care team and feel comfortable discussing sensitive topics (Kuipers et al., 2019). This improved communication can lead to better compliance with treatment plans and improved overall health outcomes.

Another way is through improved care coordination: When all care team members are on the same page, it can lead to fewer errors and duplication of services (Kuipers et al., 2019). This improved coordination can also lead to a more seamless transition of care if a patient needs to be seen by multiple specialists.

Finally, I can positively affect Improved patient education: When patients are given clear and concise information about their health condition, they are more likely to make informed decisions about their care (Kuipers et al., 2019). This improved patient education can improve treatment plan compliance and overall health outcomes.

Current Problems Affecting Healthcare Delivery

Access to Care

Access to care affects healthcare delivery by dictating how easily patients can receive the necessary care. When access to care is limited, patients may have difficulty finding providers who accept their insurance, making appointments, or affording care. This can lead to delays in care, which can, in turn, cause health problems to worsen (National Library of Medicine, 2020). Additionally, patients who have difficulty accessing care are more likely to visit the emergency room for non-urgent issues, which can strain resources and increase costs.

Strategy to Curb and the Barrier Inhibiting the Strategy

Improving access to care can be done by providing transportation assistance to patients who do not have means of transportation. Another way to improve access to care is to provide financial assistance to patients who cannot afford to pay for their care (National Library of Medicine, 2020). One barrier that inhibits access to healthcare is the lack of transportation for the patients that lack a means of transport.

Cost of Care

One of the most significant variables influencing healthcare provision is the cost of care. It has an impact on the services that are offered as well as the accessibility and quality of care. Higher costs can limit access to care, especially for those already struggling to pay for necessities. It can also lead to rationing, resulting in substandard care (National Library of Medicine, 2020). In addition, the cost of care affects the financial stability of providers, which can impact the quality and continuity of care.

Strategy to Curb and the Barrier Inhibiting the Strategy

Reducing the cost of care can be done by providing discounts to patients who pay cash for their care. Another way to reduce the cost of care is to negotiate lower prices with healthcare providers (National Library of Medicine, 2020). Lack of patient discounts is one factor limiting the achievement of reduced care costs. Another barrier is the need for negotiation power with healthcare providers.

Quality of Care

Quality of care affects healthcare delivery in several perspectives. First, when the quality of care is high, patients are more likely to receive the care they need and are less likely to experience complications. When the quality of care is low, patients are more likely to experience complications and may not receive the care they need (Oleribe et al., 2019). Quality of care also affects health care costs, as high-quality care is often more expensive than low-quality care.

Strategy to Curb and the Barrier Inhibiting the Strategy

Improving the quality of care can be done by providing training for providers on how to communicate effectively with patients from diverse backgrounds. Another way to improve the quality of care is to provide resources for providers on how to best communicate with patients from different cultures (Oleribe et al., 2019). One barrier that inhibits the administration of quality care is the need for more training for practitioners to speak with patients from diverse backgrounds. Lack of enough resources is another problem that affects the administration of quality healthcare for patients from different cultures. 

Provider Burnout

Provider burnout is a significant problem in the healthcare industry that can significantly impact care delivery. Provider burnout can decrease the quality of care delivered and, ultimately, lead to poorer health outcomes for patients. Several factors can contribute to provider burnout, including high workloads, long hours, and lack of control over one’s work. In addition, providers who feel their work is not valued or appreciated are more likely to experience burnout (Oleribe et al., 2019). The consequences of provider burnout can be serious and far-reaching. In addition to impacting the quality of care that patients receive, it can also lead to increased provider turnover, which can be costly and disruptive to healthcare organizations.

Strategy to Curb and the Barrier Inhibiting the Strategy

One way to reduce provider burnout is to train providers on self-care and stress management. Another way to reduce provider burnout is to provide financial assistance to providers struggling to pay their bills.

References

Greiner, A. C., & Knebel, E. (2020). The core competencies needed for health care professionals. National Academies Press (US). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK221519/

Kuipers, S. J., Cramm, J. M., & Nieboer, A. P. (2019). The Importance of patient-centered Care and co-creation of Care for Satisfaction with Care and Physical and Social well-being of Patients with multi-morbidity in the Primary Care Setting. BMC Health Services Research, 19(1), 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-018-3818-y

Oleribe, O. E., Momoh, J., Uzochukwu, B. S., Mbofana, F., Adebiyi, A., Barbera, T., Williams, R., & Taylor Robinson, S. D. (2019). Identifying key challenges facing healthcare systems in Africa and potential solutions. International Journal of General Medicine, Volume 12, 395–403. https://doi.org/10.2147/ijgm.s223882

Santana, M. J., Manalili, K., Jolley, R. J., Zelinsky, S., Quan, H., & Lu, M. (2017). How to practice person-centered care: A conceptual framework. Health Expectations, 21(2), 429–440. https://doi.org/10.1111/hex.12640